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Will security firms detect police spyware?

17 September, 2013 at 7:14 pm by anonymous!

By Declan McCullagh, News.com
Published on ZDNet News: Jul 17, 2007 11:00:00 AM
———————————————————————————-
* This article is being archived on pastebins because it is not available at the original location where it was published. This copy/paste does not include the links (urls) within the article.

original story url: http://news.zdnet.com/2100-1009_22-6197020.html

* Attention ZDNet News: Please do not move or expire articles as they age.

“The New Zealand Copyright Act 1994 specifies certain circumstances where all or a substantial part of a copyright work may be used without the copyright owner’s permission. A “fair dealing” with copyright material does not infringe copyright if it is for the following purposes: research or private study; criticism or review; or reporting current events.”
———————————————————————————-

“A recent federal court decision raises the question of whether antivirus companies may intentionally overlook spyware that is secretly placed on computers by police.

In the case decided earlier this month by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, federal agents used spyware with a keystroke logger–call it fedware–to record the typing of a suspected Ecstasy manufacturer who used encryption to thwart the police.

A CNET News.com survey of 13 leading antispyware vendors found that not one company acknowledged cooperating unofficially with government agencies. Some, however, indicated that they would not alert customers to the presence of fedware if they were ordered by a court to remain quiet.
Spyware survey

Most of the companies surveyed, which covered the range from tiny firms to Symantec and IBM, said they never had received such a court order. The full list of companies surveyed: AVG/Grisoft, Computer Associates, Check Point, eEye, IBM, Kaspersky Lab, McAfee, Microsoft, Sana Security, Sophos, Symantec, Trend Micro and Websense. Only McAfee and Microsoft flatly declined to answer that question. (Click here for the verbatim responses to the survey.)

Because only two known criminal prosecutions in the United States involve police use of key loggers, important legal rules remain unsettled. But key logger makers say that police and investigative agencies are frequent customers, in part because recording keystrokes can bypass the increasingly common use of encryption to scramble communications and hard drives. Microsoft’s Windows Vista and Apple’s OS X include built-in encryption.

Some companies that responded to the survey were vehemently pro-privacy. “Our customers are paying us for a service, to protect them from all forms of malicious code,” said Marc Maiffret, eEye Digital Security’s co-founder and chief technology officer. “It is not up to us to do law enforcement’s job for them so we do not, and will not, make any exceptions for law enforcement malware or other tools.” eEye sells Blink Personal for $25, which includes antivirus and antispyware features.

Others were more conciliatory. Check Point, which makes the popular ZoneAlarm utility, said it would offer federal police the “same courtesy” that it extends to legitimate third-party vendors that request to be whitelisted. A Check Point representative said, though, that the company had “never been” in that situation.

This isn’t exactly a new question. After the last high-profile case in which federal agents turned to a key logger, some security companies allegedly volunteered to ignore fedware. The Associated Press reported in 2001 that “McAfee Corp. contacted the FBI… to ensure its software wouldn’t inadvertently detect the bureau’s snooping software.” McAfee subsequently said the report was inaccurate.

=

Later that year, the FBI confirmed that it was creating spy software called “Magic Lantern” that would allow agents to inject keystroke loggers remotely through a virus without having physical access to the computer. (In both the recent Ecstasy case and the earlier key logging case involving an alleged mobster, federal agents obtained court orders authorizing them to break into buildings to install key loggers.)

Government agencies and backdoors in technology products have a long and frequently clandestine relationship. One 1995 expose by the Baltimore Sun described how the National Security Agency persuaded a Swiss firm, Crypto, to build backdoors into its encryption devices. In his 1982 book, The Puzzle Palace, author James Bamford described how the NSA’s predecessor in 1945 coerced Western Union, RCA and ITT Communications to turn over telegraph traffic to the feds.

More recently, after the BBC reported last year on supposed talks between the British government and Microsoft, the software maker pledged not to build backdoors into Windows Vista’s encryption functions.

A recent federal court decision raises the question of whether antivirus companies may intentionally overlook spyware that is secretly placed on computers by police.

In the case decided earlier this month by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, federal agents used spyware with a keystroke logger–call it fedware–to record the typing of a suspected Ecstasy manufacturer who used encryption to thwart the police.

A CNET News.com survey of 13 leading antispyware vendors found that not one company acknowledged cooperating unofficially with government agencies. Some, however, indicated that they would not alert customers to the presence of fedware if they were ordered by a court to remain quiet.
Spyware survey

Most of the companies surveyed, which covered the range from tiny firms to Symantec and IBM, said they never had received such a court order. The full list of companies surveyed: AVG/Grisoft, Computer Associates, Check Point, eEye, IBM, Kaspersky Lab, McAfee, Microsoft, Sana Security, Sophos, Symantec, Trend Micro and Websense. Only McAfee and Microsoft flatly declined to answer that question. (Click here for the verbatim responses to the survey.)

Because only two known criminal prosecutions in the United States involve police use of key loggers, important legal rules remain unsettled. But key logger makers say that police and investigative agencies are frequent customers, in part because recording keystrokes can bypass the increasingly common use of encryption to scramble communications and hard drives. Microsoft’s Windows Vista and Apple’s OS X include built-in encryption.

Some companies that responded to the survey were vehemently pro-privacy. “Our customers are paying us for a service, to protect them from all forms of malicious code,” said Marc Maiffret, eEye Digital Security’s co-founder and chief technology officer. “It is not up to us to do law enforcement’s job for them so we do not, and will not, make any exceptions for law enforcement malware or other tools.” eEye sells Blink Personal for $25, which includes antivirus and antispyware features.

Others were more conciliatory. Check Point, which makes the popular ZoneAlarm utility, said it would offer federal police the “same courtesy” that it extends to legitimate third-party vendors that request to be whitelisted. A Check Point representative said, though, that the company had “never been” in that situation.

This isn’t exactly a new question. After the last high-profile case in which federal agents turned to a key logger, some security companies allegedly volunteered to ignore fedware. The Associated Press reported in 2001 that “McAfee Corp. contacted the FBI… to ensure its software wouldn’t inadvertently detect the bureau’s snooping software.” McAfee subsequently said the report was inaccurate.

=

Later that year, the FBI confirmed that it was creating spy software called “Magic Lantern” that would allow agents to inject keystroke loggers remotely through a virus without having physical access to the computer. (In both the recent Ecstasy case and the earlier key logging case involving an alleged mobster, federal agents obtained court orders authorizing them to break into buildings to install key loggers.)

Government agencies and backdoors in technology products have a long and frequently clandestine relationship. One 1995 expose by the Baltimore Sun described how the National Security Agency persuaded a Swiss firm, Crypto, to build backdoors into its encryption devices. In his 1982 book, The Puzzle Palace, author James Bamford described how the NSA’s predecessor in 1945 coerced Western Union, RCA and ITT Communications to turn over telegraph traffic to the feds.

More recently, after the BBC reported last year on supposed talks between the British government and Microsoft, the software maker pledged not to build backdoors into Windows Vista’s encryption functions.

Even if the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration or other federal police haven’t tried to compel security companies to whitelist fedware, security experts predict that such a court order is just a matter of time.

What remains unclear, however, is whether police have the legal authority to do so under current law. “The government would be pushing the boundaries of the law if it attempted to obtain such an order,” said Kevin Bankston, an attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation who has litigated wiretapping cases. “There’s simply no precedent for this sort of thing.”

One possibility is a section of the Wiretap Act that says courts can “direct that a provider of wire or electronic communication service, landlord, custodian or other person” to help with electronic surveillance.

“There is some breadth in that language that is of concern and that the Justice Department may attempt to exploit,” Bankston said.

In theory, government agencies could even seek a court order requiring security companies to deliver spyware to their customers as part of an auto-update feature. Most modern security companies, including operating system makers such as Microsoft and Apple, offer regular patches and bug fixes. Although it would be technically tricky, it would be possible to send an infected update to a customer if the vendor were ordered to do so.

When asked if it had ever received such a court order, Microsoft demurred. “Microsoft frequently has confidential conversations with both customers and government agencies and does not comment on those conversations,” a company representative said. Of the 13 companies surveyed, McAfee was the other company that declined to answer. (Two others could not be reached as of Tuesday morning.)

Some security companies refused to reply to the initial version of our survey, which broadly asked about fedware whitelisting. In response, we revised the question to ask if they would alert a customer to the presence of keystroke loggers installed by a police or intelligence agency “in the absence of a lawful court order signed by a judge.”

Cris Paden, Symantec’s manger of corporate public relations, initially declined to reply. “There are legitimate reasons for not giving blanket guarantees–one of those is a court order,” he said at first. “There are extenuating circumstances and gray issues.”

But after we altered the question, Paden replied: “Barring a court order to cooperate with law enforcement authorities, Symantec would definitely alert our customers to the presence of any malicious code or programs that we detect on their systems.” He added that Symantec had “absolutely not” received any such a court order.

One danger with whitelisting fedware is that it creates a potentially serious vulnerability in security software. If a malicious vendor of spyware were clever enough to mimic the whitelisted government spyware, it would also go undetected.

But if fedware becomes more common, savvy criminals could simply turn to open-source software that’s less likely to have backdoors for police. ClamAV and OpenAntiVirus.org both offer open-source security software, and it’s also possible to boot off of a CD-ROM and inspect the hard drive for malicious tampering.

At the moment, at least, there aren’t any industry standards about detecting fedware. “CSIA does not currently have a position on this issue nor has the issue ever been addressed by its board of directors,” said Tim Bennett, president of the Cyber Security Industry Alliance.
Even if the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration or other federal police haven’t tried to compel security companies to whitelist fedware, security experts predict that such a court order is just a matter of time.

What remains unclear, however, is whether police have the legal authority to do so under current law. “The government would be pushing the boundaries of the law if it attempted to obtain such an order,” said Kevin Bankston, an attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation who has litigated wiretapping cases. “There’s simply no precedent for this sort of thing.”

One possibility is a section of the Wiretap Act that says courts can “direct that a provider of wire or electronic communication service, landlord, custodian or other person” to help with electronic surveillance.

“There is some breadth in that language that is of concern and that the Justice Department may attempt to exploit,” Bankston said.

In theory, government agencies could even seek a court order requiring security companies to deliver spyware to their customers as part of an auto-update feature. Most modern security companies, including operating system makers such as Microsoft and Apple, offer regular patches and bug fixes. Although it would be technically tricky, it would be possible to send an infected update to a customer if the vendor were ordered to do so.

When asked if it had ever received such a court order, Microsoft demurred. “Microsoft frequently has confidential conversations with both customers and government agencies and does not comment on those conversations,” a company representative said. Of the 13 companies surveyed, McAfee was the other company that declined to answer. (Two others could not be reached as of Tuesday morning.)

Some security companies refused to reply to the initial version of our survey, which broadly asked about fedware whitelisting. In response, we revised the question to ask if they would alert a customer to the presence of keystroke loggers installed by a police or intelligence agency “in the absence of a lawful court order signed by a judge.”

Cris Paden, Symantec’s manger of corporate public relations, initially declined to reply. “There are legitimate reasons for not giving blanket guarantees–one of those is a court order,” he said at first. “There are extenuating circumstances and gray issues.”

But after we altered the question, Paden replied: “Barring a court order to cooperate with law enforcement authorities, Symantec would definitely alert our customers to the presence of any malicious code or programs that we detect on their systems.” He added that Symantec had “absolutely not” received any such a court order.

One danger with whitelisting fedware is that it creates a potentially serious vulnerability in security software. If a malicious vendor of spyware were clever enough to mimic the whitelisted government spyware, it would also go undetected.

But if fedware becomes more common, savvy criminals could simply turn to open-source software that’s less likely to have backdoors for police. ClamAV and OpenAntiVirus.org both offer open-source security software, and it’s also possible to boot off of a CD-ROM and inspect the hard drive for malicious tampering.

At the moment, at least, there aren’t any industry standards about detecting fedware. “CSIA does not currently have a position on this issue nor has the issue ever been addressed by its board of directors,” said Tim Bennett, president of the Cyber Security Industry Alliance.”

New Paste
Name: Title:
Will security firms detect police spyware? By Declan McCullagh, News.com Published on ZDNet News: Jul 17, 2007 11:00:00 AM ———————————————————————————- * This article is being archived on pastebins because it is not available at the original location where it was published. This copy/paste does not include the links (urls) within the article. original story url: http://news.zdnet.com/2100-1009_22-6197020.html * Attention ZDNet News: Please do not move or expire articles as they age. “The New Zealand Copyright Act 1994 specifies certain circumstances where all or a substantial part of a copyright work may be used without the copyright owner’s permission. A “fair dealing” with copyright material does not infringe copyright if it is for the following purposes: research or private study; criticism or review; or reporting current events.” ———————————————————————————- “A recent federal court decision raises the question of whether antivirus companies may intentionally overlook spyware that is secretly placed on computers by police. In the case decided earlier this month by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, federal agents used spyware with a keystroke logger–call it fedware–to record the typing of a suspected Ecstasy manufacturer who used encryption to thwart the police. A CNET News.com survey of 13 leading antispyware vendors found that not one company acknowledged cooperating unofficially with government agencies. Some, however, indicated that they would not alert customers to the presence of fedware if they were ordered by a court to remain quiet. Spyware survey Most of the companies surveyed, which covered the range from tiny firms to Symantec and IBM, said they never had received such a court order. The full list of companies surveyed: AVG/Grisoft, Computer Associates, Check Point, eEye, IBM, Kaspersky Lab, McAfee, Microsoft, Sana Security, Sophos, Symantec, Trend Micro and Websense. Only McAfee and Microsoft flatly declined to answer that question. (Click here for the verbatim responses to the survey.) Because only two known criminal prosecutions in the United States involve police use of key loggers, important legal rules remain unsettled. But key logger makers say that police and investigative agencies are frequent customers, in part because recording keystrokes can bypass the increasingly common use of encryption to scramble communications and hard drives. Microsoft’s Windows Vista and Apple’s OS X include built-in encryption. Some companies that responded to the survey were vehemently pro-privacy. “Our customers are paying us for a service, to protect them from all forms of malicious code,” said Marc Maiffret, eEye Digital Security’s co-founder and chief technology officer. “It is not up to us to do law enforcement’s job for them so we do not, and will not, make any exceptions for law enforcement malware or other tools.” eEye sells Blink Personal for $25, which includes antivirus and antispyware features. Others were more conciliatory. Check Point, which makes the popular ZoneAlarm utility, said it would offer federal police the “same courtesy” that it extends to legitimate third-party vendors that request to be whitelisted. A Check Point representative said, though, that the company had “never been” in that situation. This isn’t exactly a new question. After the last high-profile case in which federal agents turned to a key logger, some security companies allegedly volunteered to ignore fedware. The Associated Press reported in 2001 that “McAfee Corp. contacted the FBI… to ensure its software wouldn’t inadvertently detect the bureau’s snooping software.” McAfee subsequently said the report was inaccurate. = Later that year, the FBI confirmed that it was creating spy software called “Magic Lantern” that would allow agents to inject keystroke loggers remotely through a virus without having physical access to the computer. (In both the recent Ecstasy case and the earlier key logging case involving an alleged mobster, federal agents obtained court orders authorizing them to break into buildings to install key loggers.) Government agencies and backdoors in technology products have a long and frequently clandestine relationship. One 1995 expose by the Baltimore Sun described how the National Security Agency persuaded a Swiss firm, Crypto, to build backdoors into its encryption devices. In his 1982 book, The Puzzle Palace, author James Bamford described how the NSA’s predecessor in 1945 coerced Western Union, RCA and ITT Communications to turn over telegraph traffic to the feds. More recently, after the BBC reported last year on supposed talks between the British government and Microsoft, the software maker pledged not to build backdoors into Windows Vista’s encryption functions. A recent federal court decision raises the question of whether antivirus companies may intentionally overlook spyware that is secretly placed on computers by police. In the case decided earlier this month by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, federal agents used spyware with a keystroke logger–call it fedware–to record the typing of a suspected Ecstasy manufacturer who used encryption to thwart the police. A CNET News.com survey of 13 leading antispyware vendors found that not one company acknowledged cooperating unofficially with government agencies. Some, however, indicated that they would not alert customers to the presence of fedware if they were ordered by a court to remain quiet. Spyware survey Most of the companies surveyed, which covered the range from tiny firms to Symantec and IBM, said they never had received such a court order. The full list of companies surveyed: AVG/Grisoft, Computer Associates, Check Point, eEye, IBM, Kaspersky Lab, McAfee, Microsoft, Sana Security, Sophos, Symantec, Trend Micro and Websense. Only McAfee and Microsoft flatly declined to answer that question. (Click here for the verbatim responses to the survey.) Because only two known criminal prosecutions in the United States involve police use of key loggers, important legal rules remain unsettled. But key logger makers say that police and investigative agencies are frequent customers, in part because recording keystrokes can bypass the increasingly common use of encryption to scramble communications and hard drives. Microsoft’s Windows Vista and Apple’s OS X include built-in encryption. Some companies that responded to the survey were vehemently pro-privacy. “Our customers are paying us for a service, to protect them from all forms of malicious code,” said Marc Maiffret, eEye Digital Security’s co-founder and chief technology officer. “It is not up to us to do law enforcement’s job for them so we do not, and will not, make any exceptions for law enforcement malware or other tools.” eEye sells Blink Personal for $25, which includes antivirus and antispyware features. Others were more conciliatory. Check Point, which makes the popular ZoneAlarm utility, said it would offer federal police the “same courtesy” that it extends to legitimate third-party vendors that request to be whitelisted. A Check Point representative said, though, that the company had “never been” in that situation. This isn’t exactly a new question. After the last high-profile case in which federal agents turned to a key logger, some security companies allegedly volunteered to ignore fedware. The Associated Press reported in 2001 that “McAfee Corp. contacted the FBI… to ensure its software wouldn’t inadvertently detect the bureau’s snooping software.” McAfee subsequently said the report was inaccurate. = Later that year, the FBI confirmed that it was creating spy software called “Magic Lantern” that would allow agents to inject keystroke loggers remotely through a virus without having physical access to the computer. (In both the recent Ecstasy case and the earlier key logging case involving an alleged mobster, federal agents obtained court orders authorizing them to break into buildings to install key loggers.) Government agencies and backdoors in technology products have a long and frequently clandestine relationship. One 1995 expose by the Baltimore Sun described how the National Security Agency persuaded a Swiss firm, Crypto, to build backdoors into its encryption devices. In his 1982 book, The Puzzle Palace, author James Bamford described how the NSA’s predecessor in 1945 coerced Western Union, RCA and ITT Communications to turn over telegraph traffic to the feds. More recently, after the BBC reported last year on supposed talks between the British government and Microsoft, the software maker pledged not to build backdoors into Windows Vista’s encryption functions. Even if the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration or other federal police haven’t tried to compel security companies to whitelist fedware, security experts predict that such a court order is just a matter of time. What remains unclear, however, is whether police have the legal authority to do so under current law. “The government would be pushing the boundaries of the law if it attempted to obtain such an order,” said Kevin Bankston, an attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation who has litigated wiretapping cases. “There’s simply no precedent for this sort of thing.” One possibility is a section of the Wiretap Act that says courts can “direct that a provider of wire or electronic communication service, landlord, custodian or other person” to help with electronic surveillance. “There is some breadth in that language that is of concern and that the Justice Department may attempt to exploit,” Bankston said. In theory, government agencies could even seek a court order requiring security companies to deliver spyware to their customers as part of an auto-update feature. Most modern security companies, including operating system makers such as Microsoft and Apple, offer regular patches and bug fixes. Although it would be technically tricky, it would be possible to send an infected update to a customer if the vendor were ordered to do so. When asked if it had ever received such a court order, Microsoft demurred. “Microsoft frequently has confidential conversations with both customers and government agencies and does not comment on those conversations,” a company representative said. Of the 13 companies surveyed, McAfee was the other company that declined to answer. (Two others could not be reached as of Tuesday morning.) Some security companies refused to reply to the initial version of our survey, which broadly asked about fedware whitelisting. In response, we revised the question to ask if they would alert a customer to the presence of keystroke loggers installed by a police or intelligence agency “in the absence of a lawful court order signed by a judge.” Cris Paden, Symantec’s manger of corporate public relations, initially declined to reply. “There are legitimate reasons for not giving blanket guarantees–one of those is a court order,” he said at first. “There are extenuating circumstances and gray issues.” But after we altered the question, Paden replied: “Barring a court order to cooperate with law enforcement authorities, Symantec would definitely alert our customers to the presence of any malicious code or programs that we detect on their systems.” He added that Symantec had “absolutely not” received any such a court order. One danger with whitelisting fedware is that it creates a potentially serious vulnerability in security software. If a malicious vendor of spyware were clever enough to mimic the whitelisted government spyware, it would also go undetected. But if fedware becomes more common, savvy criminals could simply turn to open-source software that’s less likely to have backdoors for police. ClamAV and OpenAntiVirus.org both offer open-source security software, and it’s also possible to boot off of a CD-ROM and inspect the hard drive for malicious tampering. At the moment, at least, there aren’t any industry standards about detecting fedware. “CSIA does not currently have a position on this issue nor has the issue ever been addressed by its board of directors,” said Tim Bennett, president of the Cyber Security Industry Alliance. Even if the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration or other federal police haven’t tried to compel security companies to whitelist fedware, security experts predict that such a court order is just a matter of time. What remains unclear, however, is whether police have the legal authority to do so under current law. “The government would be pushing the boundaries of the law if it attempted to obtain such an order,” said Kevin Bankston, an attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation who has litigated wiretapping cases. “There’s simply no precedent for this sort of thing.” One possibility is a section of the Wiretap Act that says courts can “direct that a provider of wire or electronic communication service, landlord, custodian or other person” to help with electronic surveillance. “There is some breadth in that language that is of concern and that the Justice Department may attempt to exploit,” Bankston said. In theory, government agencies could even seek a court order requiring security companies to deliver spyware to their customers as part of an auto-update feature. Most modern security companies, including operating system makers such as Microsoft and Apple, offer regular patches and bug fixes. Although it would be technically tricky, it would be possible to send an infected update to a customer if the vendor were ordered to do so. When asked if it had ever received such a court order, Microsoft demurred. “Microsoft frequently has confidential conversations with both customers and government agencies and does not comment on those conversations,” a company representative said. Of the 13 companies surveyed, McAfee was the other company that declined to answer. (Two others could not be reached as of Tuesday morning.) Some security companies refused to reply to the initial version of our survey, which broadly asked about fedware whitelisting. In response, we revised the question to ask if they would alert a customer to the presence of keystroke loggers installed by a police or intelligence agency “in the absence of a lawful court order signed by a judge.” Cris Paden, Symantec’s manger of corporate public relations, initially declined to reply. “There are legitimate reasons for not giving blanket guarantees–one of those is a court order,” he said at first. “There are extenuating circumstances and gray issues.” But after we altered the question, Paden replied: “Barring a court order to cooperate with law enforcement authorities, Symantec would definitely alert our customers to the presence of any malicious code or programs that we detect on their systems.” He added that Symantec had “absolutely not” received any such a court order. One danger with whitelisting fedware is that it creates a potentially serious vulnerability in security software. If a malicious vendor of spyware were clever enough to mimic the whitelisted government spyware, it would also go undetected. But if fedware becomes more common, savvy criminals could simply turn to open-source software that’s less likely to have backdoors for police. ClamAV and OpenAntiVirus.org both offer open-source security software, and it’s also possible to boot off of a CD-ROM and inspect the hard drive for malicious tampering. At the moment, at least, there aren’t any industry standards about detecting fedware. “CSIA does not currently have a position on this issue nor has the issue ever been addressed by its board of directors,” said Tim Bennett, president of the Cyber Security Industry Alliance.”


Number of Tor clients explode

4 September, 2013 at 7:54 am by anonymous!

The number of Tor clients connected to the Tor network has exploded the past few weeks and the number of new clients is still increasing. This has causes the Tor network to become somewhat overloaded.

tor_userstats

This hockey-stick is already making the Tor network overloaded. What is going on, and what if it keeps increasing?

Realtime data here: https://metrics.torproject.org/users.html



Litetree, a new Litecoin-exclusive Exchange

1 August, 2013 at 4:59 pm by anonymous!

Popmoney, Dwolla, and bank transfers will all be accepted to buy and sell Litecoins.

(press release as received)

Litetree, a new exchange specifically for buying and selling Litecoins, launch to provide Litecoin users with a new option for obtaining Litecoins, with new options for currencies that other exchanges don’t provide. The exchange is still new but hopes to have a competitive edge
among the few exchanges available for Litecoin users.

The lack of Litecoin exchanges is troubling for Litecoin users. Litetree hopes to contribute to the expansion of Litecoin and encourage use. Due to the huge focus on Bitcoin in the media, it’s been growing fast and keeping forks like Litecoin in its shadow. The advantages of Litecoin are more often than not left tucked away on Internet forums, than discussed on news networks. With the emergence of new exchanges, though, there will be more popularity as the system’s security increases with decentralization resulting from numerous exchanges.

Litetree is poised to become the fourth major Litecoin exchange to date, and the only exchange that caters to Popmoney, Dwolla, and bank transfers for US and international litecoin miners. In hopes of setting precedents for future Litecoin exchanges, Litetree won’t deal with other cryptocurrencies. This may even inspire an evolution in online marketplaces, and more sellers accepting Litecoin may crop up over time.

Questions, comments, and suggestions for Litetree are always welcome. Please leave a comment below, or message partners@litetree.com


A few points: 1) LiteTree has a 0.5% trading fee. This is very cheap compared to traditional banking products, stock brokers and so on – but it is not that cheap in the digital currency world. Bitfinex has 0.15% trading fee on both LTC and LTC/BTC. 2) There is still very little use of LTC beyond a black market place called Atlantis and “investment”. But this was also true for BTC once and that changed. 3) LTC/USD looks to be in a downtrend on both daily and four hour charts. There is, however, very little data to look at since it has not been traded very long. 4) SierraChart only provides trading data history back to May for one lite exchange: btc-e. May closed as a hangman, June closed at a lower long-legged doji and July closed as another dojii with a lower mini body. Going long LTC may not be a very good idea, but opinions vary.


Atlantis, the new Litecoin Tor .onion market

26 March, 2013 at 2:45 am by anonymous!
atlantis

guest post from Bitcointalk.

Hello fellow Litecoiners.

We have made posts on the Litecoin forums, however we needed to wait for this account to be approved by a moderator before we officially launched here. So here it is. The official thread. We will update this thread as we go, and answer questions when we can find the time away from our busy development schedule. We have lots planned to ensure the successful growth of Atlantis.

Today we would like to officially announce the release of our new website & service, Atlantis — The free market.

Many of you will be familiar with SilkRoad, and as I’m sure most of you will agree, SR has put Bitcoin on the map and in the eyes of the general public, the media, and the cryptocurrency communities. SR continues to strengthen the Bitcoin economy to this day.

Our team decided that in order for Litecoin to make its mark in the cryptocurrency world it needed a similar service backing it.

So, with that being said, we would like to officially invite you all to Atlantis (or ATL for short), the Litecoin free market. Users of SR will feel at home using our website. However we’ve also improved on a few key areas that are a weakness in the current SR service, such as security, overall look & feel, ease of use, regular updates and last but definitely not least — cheaper commission rates!

Regardless of whether or not you support this kind of activity, we are certain that with the right leadership this is a positive step toward the adoption and tangibility of the Litecoin currency.

To access Atlantis, you have a few options:

1. Download the Tor Browser Bundle at: https://www.torproject.org/download/download-easy.html.en and navigate to http://atlantisrky4es5q.onion
2. Configure your browser to use the Tor client (Tor client also downloaded at the above).
3. You can access the website without any additional software by clicking here: http://atlantisrky4es5q.onion.sh or here: http://atlantisrky4es5q.tor2web.org — These are Tor proxy services.

We tend to find the proxy services operate faster, however if maximum security is your concern you should use the Browser Bundle. This should not be an issue if you are using the website to purchase legal goods (yes, we sell those too).

To familiarize yourself with the website we have created a buyer and seller guide which can be accessed upon logging in.

For a limited time, we will also be giving the first 3 MONTHS of trades entirely commission free to high sellers on other markets. If you wish to take up this opportunity, and can provide proof of ownership of your account on the other market, please create an account on Atlantis and message support. Please note we will only be giving these to limited users, apologies if you miss out.

We will also be answering questions in this thread, so feel free to ask away. Trolls will be ignored.

Commission has been reduced to %6 for orders under $50, and less for other orders. View sellers guide for further information.

Vendor account status has been increased to $20 ($10 is too cheap to deter scammers according to the community feedback we have received).

Many thanks,
The Atlantis team.


The Mysterious Death of Shannon Larratt and Encryption / Privacy / Deep-Dark-Web

20 March, 2013 at 1:14 pm by anonymous!
Microwave Gun

(guest post by anonymous)

Shannon Larratt’s last words (from pastebin) were:

Finita, la commedia
Friday, March 15, 2013
As the saying goes, “by the time you read this I’ll be dead.” Caitlin has probably posted it by my request, or it’s been posted as part of a dead-man switch. I have known this was coming for years, at times even hoped for it, and most of that time I haven’t ever been afraid of it, although as it’s grown closer I’ve felt equal parts dread and relief, with a little bit of panic mixxed in. I wish I could have lived much, much longer as there is still so much I want to do and see and be a part of, although in the time I had I could not have asked for a more wonderful life. I’ve had the opportunity to do remarkable things, see my dreams made real and changed the world and the lives of many for the better, loved and been loved, and have an amazing daughter who I hope will have her own wonderful life. My biggest sadness is not being able to be a part of more of it, and I have spent many days in tears trying to figure out a way to squeeze more meaningful time out of this life. There’s just so much more I want to do — and I think everyone knows I’ve done a lot. But not enough. If I knew my live was going to be this short, I would have pushed harder, not frittered so much of it away. I wish I’d seized every single opportunity, not just “many of them”, thinking “I can do that next year.” I’ve always thought that for me the “undiscovered country” was in the Star Trek sense of the word — that is, the glorious future — but instead I’ve gotten stuck with Hamlet’s “undiscovered country”, or death: “But that the dread of something after death, the undiscovered country, from whose bourn no traveller returns, puzzles the will, and makes us rather bear those ills we have than fly to others that we know not of?”

The last three or four years have been a daily struggle, beginning with a multi-layered pain made up of a never-ending, never-lulling dull throbbing from the core of my muscles beginning in my legs and eventually spreading out over my entire body, coupled with a constant burning sensation in my skin that made it impossible for me to feel anyone’s touch without it being a bitter agony. I held out hope that a treatment for the pain if not a cure could be found, but every difficult diagnostic step only confirmed the degenerative condition replacing healthy tissue with junk calcium was incurable, and every new attempt to treat the pain only emphasized that it was inescapable. Not only that, but every day it grew. As impossibly painful every day of this process has been, it has been made more difficult by knowing that the next day will always be worse, and every day that goes by I have less defences against a more powerful foe. There was a time that I believed that I could cope with the unending pain, but then the pain’s root began catching up to me as less and less healthy muscle tissue remained. Every day I could walk a little less. Carry a little less. Use my hands a little less. Bit by bit it chipped away at me. As I write this even standing up is indescribably painful, even sitting up, and the idea of walking nightmarish, although I have done my best to hide it and keep it buried. In addition to the muscles breaking down, neurological and autonomic problems have been creeping up, either because of the condition itself or because of the treatment. I’ve certainly said this before, but I don’t feel like I have the strength to keep trying less and less likely options. My mind is the only thing I have left. This has actually been written over several months as I try and assemble it in small pieces while I have enough lucidity to do so. The remainders of my days feel emptier and intellectually lonelier — I can’t begin to describe the horror of going from a voracious reader and consumer of knowledge to someone who looks at a page full of words and sees only a hash of lines and shapes, devoid of real meaning. In any case, I’m done. I’m tired out. I don’t want to do this any more. I have had a very good life, but it’s not good any more.

I do admit that the closest I come to any sense of “life after death” is my nagging suspicion that we’re living in a simulation… I don’t know that I buy the statistical argument (since there is only one “real” reality, and a huge number of simulations, we are almost certainly in a simulation), because it makes so many big assumptions, but there are other convincing hints — the quantized nature of reality, so of the weirdness at the edges of perception, and so on, to say nothing of how “special” life feels. If such a thing is true, I don’t know if perception continues outside of the simulation. I doubt it to be honest. But thinking about such things makes me value both the unreality of existence, the interconnectedness of consciousness, how temporary existence is, and also how permanent and real it is, if that makes any sense… I do hope there’s “more”, but I have accepted the likelihood that there isn’t, and find comfort in both. And really, if it’s a simulation, I have no idea of you just blip out of existence and get your data set analyzed, or if there’s some eternal being that actually experiences your life post-life, as if waking from a dream or playing a game, or if we reboot in some technological reincarnation. We’re all the centre of our universe. That is, right now I feel I could be the only sentience in world filled NPCs. But if you’re reading this, and I’m gone, well, then I guess I was the NPC and you’re the only true consciousness, haha. Naw, I don’t really think any of think on any serious level but I do enjoy thinking about it. And to be clear, as a “no doubts” atheist, I am quite firmly rooted in reality the majority of the time.

I have mixed feelings about the medical treatment that I’ve received. From everything I have seen and understand, I don’t believe that anything could have been done to fundamentally “cure” me (although I suspect that cures for these sorts of genetic conditions will come in a decade or two — I wish I could have made it that long). This condition is what it is, and it was probably fated for me the day I was born. On the positive side, I was given genetic gifts that made me uniquely qualified to achieve the things I did (and again — I wish I had done more), so I really can’t justly complain that I got some bad with the good. But I do believe that there were fundamental shortcomings in the way both my condition and my pain was treated, and that the last few years could have been much more pleasant if the pain had been more aggressively managed. I believe this was in part because of the prejudice of multiple doctors due to my appearance causing them to stereotype me as drug seeking (and the simple reality is that it can be hard to tell, and we are so cruel as to prefer to “punish” the sick than to “reward” the mentally ill). I wish there was some way to make those doctors understand the cruelty they enacted. A patient should have the right to a pain free life, even if that comes with some risk. I understand that doctors are pressured due to our “war on drugs” mentality, but I don’t think all the blame should go on the politicians. In some ways it’s pointless to second guess any of that now because what’s done is done, but the other side of that coin is that countless others in Canada and abroad are going through this right now even if I’ve escaped it. As to the shortcomings in treating my core disease — I’d say that I’ve had virtually no treatment, and unfortunately that is true for almost every sufferer of rare genetic myopathies around the world. Support groups online are horriffic. So I don’t think this is a problem with Canada per se, just that when it comes to genetic diseases, I’m just a little too early in history still. I have also felt very alone when it comes to end-of-life counselling. For a lot of this process I have felt very alone — really, I think the only person who’s really been able to understand it is Caitlin because she’s the only person that’s seen it all first hand and in private with guards down. The last medical thing I want to mention is that I want to strongly advocate for “right to die” legislation. Canada currently has no such thing. It is my strong believe that if I had known that there was a “safe”, pain-free way for me to go at a time of my choosing, hopefully at home surrouded by love, it would have brought me not just enormous peace, but I believe would have given me strength to fight this even longer than I have. As Isaac Asimov said, “No decent human being would allow an animal to suffer without putting it out of its misery. It is only to human beings that human beings are so cruel as to allow them to live on in pain, in hopelessness, in living death, without moving a muscle to help them.” And this is how I have felt for a long time now, trapped in this nightmarish prison of pain. Losing my motor skills hasn’t been fun either, but the pain is the worst part. After writing that I can’t help but think of Keats. I really do hope people will one day have as much right to control their deaths as to control their lives — it is in many ways, the fundamental human right, even more fundamental than thought and self-expression.

Darkling I listen; and, for many a time
I have been half in love with easeful Death,
Call’d him soft names in many a mused rhyme,
To take into the air my quiet breath;
Now more than ever seems it rich to die,
To cease upon the midnight with no pain,
While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad
In such an ecstasy!
Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain–
To thy high requiem become a sod.

It’s hard not to quote the whole thing — take the time to read it if you don’t know it — and while these days I’ve been feeling more like the author of the poem, at times when I am able to get my head over water, I wonder if there is a part of me that is more nightingale’s song than sod… Was it a vision, or a waking dream? Fled is that music: —-do I wake or sleep?

As I mentioned, as an atheist, I am thoroughly convinced that this is the literal end of my adventures, and again, I do find some comfort in that, knowing that my suffering is over. But I was also raised on stories, and I believe that real immortality comes from the stories that are told about you and your life and the way your deeds live on in the lives of others. I have some worries about the process of dying (that it will hurt, or that it will “go wrong” in some way), but I have no fear of death itself in part because I know that the life I chose allowed me to have a special role in changing the course of human civilization — as egotistical or even petty as that may sound, especially if you’re in the group of people that sees body modification as “just another fashion”. Perhaps it’s petty or vain to give body modification such significance, but there’s never been a point in human history where individuals have had this level of self-expressive control over their morphology and physical decorations. The work that I was a part of enriched changed the lives of millions of people for the better (and yes, a few for the worse, but I have no doubt it was a dramatic net positive), and probably even saved the lives of thousands. A friend told me once that my role was that of a “catalyst” — that I started fires inside people that helped them to change themselves (or become themselves) in positive way. I feel so lucky to have found myself in that position, and I want to offer my heartfelt thanks for everyone who made that possible. And I’d like to think that even though I was a big puzzle piece in body modification, that I was a smaller but still important puzzle piece in a larger movement of people from all sorts of diffierent subcultures fighting for mutual support in a diverse patheon of self-expression and dream chasing. I soemtimes regret that I never finished my memoir. I suppose if there’s interest in it in the future, Caitlin has all my notes for it, all my blogs, all my personal photos and videos, to say nothing of the many people who could contribute stories, so if there’s a place for it, I’m sure it will happen. If not, well, let me smile thinking that there is and let that illusion return to dust as I do.

In any case, on body modification, I hope that others will continue this mission. For a while I thought that BME was no longer needed, that its core mission had been achieved. But when I started blogging on the subject again last year, it became clear to me that while there were many, many sites and people posting body modification media, there are very few people providing the mix of community support, political activism, and hard information that BME always strove for. I think that BME can still provide that, but it’s not going to happen without a lot of good people stepping up to help, because it’s clearly having trouble keeping its head over water for a broad range of reasons. For a long time the body modification community, while deeply isolated from the mainstream in a way that may be hard for younger people today to really relate to, had a wonderful sense of solidarity — a sense that we’re all in this together, a sense of all supporting each other’s personal paths, from the subtle to the extreme — but now it feels like there’s infighting and intra-community prejudice. We once all worked together to better ourselves and share our experiences — for example the creation of BME’s various knowledge-bases (birthed from the earlier Usenet FAQs) that brought the world level-headed accurate information on modifications and their risks, as well as the thousands of detailed “experiences” that people wrote — whereas now it seems like the majority of modification media is just about posting pictures, devoid of any real stories or information, reducing them to visual pornography for people to “cheer and jeer” at. All of these changes have slowly eaten away at the character of the body modification community and changed it in subtle and unpleasant ways. I do think this is a fixable problem though, and I have talked to many, many wonderful people (both artists and enthusiasts) who have a strong passion for body modification that I am sure could be part of a restoration effort. I truly hope they will fight to keep changing the world for the better. I still believe that BME is the best place to use as a home for this due to the invaluable content it contains and the inertia it has (and I hope Rachel will accept the help that is offered), but this change has to be bigger than BME as well. I hope that everyone will use their voice for good — if you see something interesting, try and post it along with information about it (or even do a five-question interview), speak out against prejudice and support people’s self-expression, even if it’s not something you would ever want to do or can even relate to, and support the best parts of the industry. Sometimes people give me credit for the things BME achieved, but the reality is that whatever role as a guide or catalyst I played is nothing in comparison to the community as a whole — the little contributions we each made added up into something colossally beautiful. That needs to keep happening. I could go on and on, but I’ve accepted that the time has come for me to rest. I am so proud of everything we have achieved together and I want to see it go on forever. I believe in the good in this community and the importance of our contribution to the human spirit. It would be a very sad thing for this mission to grind to a halt.

My only real regrets lie with not being able to spend more time with those who stay on… My pain is over now, I hope that those who remain can find some solace in knowing that I’m not suffering any more. I wish I could have given them more and especially when it comes to Caitlin and my daughter I feel like they’ve both given me so much more than I could ever return. Caitlin suffered through my immature years, and when things finally started falling into place for us, it all got taken away so cruelly, and she has suffered alongside me though all of this. I owe her more than I could ever explain here and love her so much. And my daughter is probably singlehandedly responsible for turning me into a mature person, and is the reason I’ve held on for as long as I have. No one have I loved more. I would have given up years ago if it weren’t for hoping to spend more time with her. That brings me to one last thing that may be in bad taste. I’ve dedicated my life to helping build and protect the world of body modification and self-expression in general. Even though I was only a small part of the community that ultimately deserves the majority credit, I’d like to believe that I’ve contributed in a unique way, and personally touched many lives for the better, and that the world would be a quite different place were it not for the specific flavor of the efforts I was catalytic in. Of course I have made many mistakes and at times missed my ideals due to my own shortcomings, but in general I’ve tried to help create a world where everyone could express themselves as felt right, and be the person that they imagined themselves to be. To push for people to make their dreams and passions come true, to find new paths to joy and fulfilment, to define a better sense of self and a sense of ones place in the cosmos, bound by awareness and intellectual honesty, caution while exploring the reckless, and mutual respect. I’ve tried to encourage people to uplift each other and be good to each other, especially when it comes to self-expression, and I hope I’ve made meaningful contributions to the so-called human condition. If I have touched your life in some positive way, and you feel you want to give something back to me personally, I am hoping that there are some among you who would be willing to contribute to a trust fund to support my daughter. The person I trust to manage this is Caitlin, who you can reach by email or PayPal at caitlinjane@gmail.com

Finally, a few people have contacted me in the past asking for ashes for creamation art and body modification projects (ink rubbings, implants, and so on). Of course I’m not offended if everyone changes their mind, but I have to admit that I love the idea of living on in the artform (and community) that I’ve loved so much in such a way. Again, the right way to do that would be to contact Caitlin (I just mentioned her email), and ask her to send you some — just be willing to contribute to a share of the costs of cremation of course.

Thank you to everyone who made my life wonderful. I love you all. I wish there had been more of it, and I wish I had more to give. I’m sorry there is so much unfinished, so much left to do, but I am glad to know many wonderful people who will complete it. Last minute reflections and bits of advice… seize every opportunity that’s in front of you and live life to the fullest. Even with everything I’ve done, there is so much more I wish I’d squeezed in. Don’t let a single day (well, maybe a single day) be idle. Have every adventure you can, and explore every street — although treat the one-way streets with caution. Don’t fritter you life away into television, random browsing, and pointless substance abuse (I have at times been guilty of all of these) — although remember there are valid uses for them, both for growth and entertainment. Have passion about the future, and in the present. Especially if you’re young, push your education and your skills to their limits on every level. Don’t just graduate highschool, get a degree, get a doctorate if you can. I know these things aren’t for everyone, they they are for most, and they also open doors to some of the most special adventures. Even if you can’t afford proper schooling there are many, many ways to learn, free courses to volunteering, and so on. Value your health, and the health of our planet, and strive beyond its borders. We have such a glorious future, but never forget that your part in that future could end at any moment, so live a life that you can be pround of. And of course love and treat each other well.

As much as these last years have been the most difficult I can imagine, and there are still many deeds to be done, please know that I have had a wonderful adventure and enjoyed it immensely on the whole.

Live Long and Prosper!

Love always,

Shannon Larratt

Shannon Larratt suffered from Tubular Aggregate Myopathy.

As with all so called suicides, I was interested in what this individual was working on or talking about prior to his/her death. I usually expect to find intelligent discussions about government and its problems, usually the individual was a dissident or a member of some type of grassroots think tank working for the betterment of humanity. Or, work with encryption and/or privacy related software/hardware.

His ‘last words’ on his blog was posted: Saturday, March 16, 2013

And what was posted just prior to this? On: Wednesday, March 6, 2013

A blog post entitled “What Could Have Been?”

What does it mention? Encryption and a budding project! We have a winner! Here is the text:

“A few years ago a friend and I started work on a new community site, something that could grow an IAM type site to much larger Facebook-scale levels (generating and running not just the social network but also many media projects from within its communities), while addressing many of the shortcomings that we saw in community software. It was what we’d hoped to host on myprivatepla.net (dead site; don’t bother going there) — although of course with Jason’s passing this project was shelved.

The two major shortcomings that we saw in existing engines, coming from our experiences running community sites (me with BME’s IAM, and Jason with his own IAM2 software) were scalability and trust. For the latter, we asked ourselves how a userbase could trust a website if they didn’t trust the people running it — for example, the cases where Facebook admins have poked around inside the private messages of celebrities or otherwise abused the privacy of the site’s members, to say nothing of government warrants violating privacy. Jason and I solved this by encrypting absolutely everything possible — but doing it client-side. That is, all of the encryption takes place in the browser, so by the time it makes it to the server it’s completely encrypted. If you’re sending a message from one person to another, only the people involved are able to see it in its true form.

Given how easy it was to achieve the encryption aspects, I’m frankly a little surprised that nobody has implemented something like this — even if no mainstream company wanted to support it, I don’t think it would be difficult to write a browser plugin that added this functionality to Facebook or any other social sites.

Scalability was the other concern. The original IAM software, using ten year old hardware, was seriously optimized and could handle about 20,000 users on a single server (plus a fileserver) — and I’d wager with today’s technology could easily handle well over 100,000 users per server due to its optimization bias. However, it didn’t scale cleanly past that, although there were drawing-board multi-server implementations capable of handling far more users… Nonetheless, it was far from cheap to host, and would have only become more expensive. Facebook is said to have approaching a quarter million servers (or four or five thousand users per server, not surprising given the inefficiency of code necessitated by their AJAX-heavy philosophy and extreme “live” design), and given by the desperate attempts they’ve made recently to monetize, it’s clear that it’s a challenge paying for it all — and even if you do figure out how to monetize a site that large, it’s often difficult to stay above water for the first few years before you hit critical mass. Since we were eyeballing a mainstream site, we brainstormed solutions to avoid all of this, perhaps to bypass most hosting costs altogether by changing the rules.

Since we’d built a design philosophy in which the servers didn’t have to be trusted — public key cryptography both kept content private and perhaps more importantly protected it from tampering, the idea evolved to completely get rid of all or the majority of the servers by offloading the servers to the client side as well… Since these days people’s home computers are often always online, they would act as the hosts, both hosting for the data (public and private), the bandwidth (again, both between users and to the public), and “brains” of the site. I’m sure there would be a way to achieve this via a massive browser plugin, but the thought was to do it via a standalone app that people could run.

The home server end of things drew from a lot of the technologies developed for the darknet, projects like Freenet and Tor. For example, when relevant Onionskin routing with encrypted data was used so that when data needed to moved around, it wasn’t clear what was being moved, to whom it was being moved, or what it even was. To deal with the reality that home computers, even if theoretically always on, rarely are, the home servers acted in clusters — private content (as well as acting as the server for mobile devices) was echoed across the computers of your friends. Public content replicated as it was viewed, both so that the more people wanted to see something, the faster it would get (like a torrent), but also so that content was extremely secure against censorship.

There was also a mountain of work done to define how the system worked from an interface point of view, how personal sites and business sites could be managed, how people could group together to publish content like magazines and blogs, and so on, and some of that’s quite clever (all the things that I wanted the next IAM to become — and looking back now, there were a lots of things IAM — founded well over a decade ago — did that were many years ahead of their time), but I think the encryption and distributed nature are more important and what I wanted to mentioned here before I forget.

The thought behind all of this was to create a trusted social web where every user that’s added, adds power to the system (rather than draining it, as you’d get in a central-server architecture). None of the ideas or technologies are fundamentally new, but I don’t think I’ve ever seen them synthesized quite in this way. My own project is completely dead in the water for a wide range of reasons, but I sure would to see someone implement it… Whoever does may well find themselves being a big part of creating a better world.”

I’m not surprised. What a shame. Prior to reading the pastebin ‘trending post’ of his ‘last words’ I had never read about this individual. His blog name was called Zentastic. I’m not directly linking to it here because some of the content may be disturbing or unsuitable for some people and NSFW.

I wonder if his illness was induced somehow. Read sites like TheHiddenEvil and like sites where people who are involved in discussion or projects as I mentioned earlier receive strange illnesses or are driven to suicide. (If not fast tracked to suicide by an unhappy source in the darkness.)

(some example search terms: gang stalking, targeted individual, ti, microwave nonlethal weapons, cancer, heart attack attacks, spies, spy)

Simple example in the real world:

SECRECY NEWS
from the FAS Project on Government Secrecy
Volume 2002, Issue No. 4
January 10, 2002

NUCLEAR POSTURE REVIEW MAY NOT COMPLY WITH LAW
BILL WOULD BAN SPACE-BASED MIND CONTROL WEAPONS

https://www.fas.org/sgp/news/secrecy/2002/01/011002.html

Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-OH) introduced a bill in the House of Representatives late last year that would ban weapons in space. But while there have been many similar legislative initiatives in the past, Rep. Kucinich’s bill is distinguished by its unusually expansive definition of “weapons.”

Among the weapons that it would proscribe the new measure includes “psychotronic” devices that are “directed at individual persons or targeted populations for the purpose of … mood management, or mind control.”

No explanation for this peculiar proposal was immediately available. But the text of “The Space Preservation Act of 2001″ (H.R. 2977), introduced on October 2, may be found here:

http://www.fas.org/sgp/congress/2001/hr2977.html

The Kucinich bill was hailed by Citizens Against Human Rights Abuse, one of a number of organizations of people who say they are victims of government experimentation involving electromagnetic and other psychotronic weapons. See their web site here:

http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~welsh/

The bill has been referred to three House Committees.

and: http://rense.com/general19/kucinich.htm

This document: http://pastebin.com/6yR0FTfp

The US propaganda machine Wikipedia: has a page about Shannon: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shannon_Larratt


Amazon in bed with the CIA

20 March, 2013 at 1:05 pm by anonymous!

BlackHelicoptersMercsThe popular cloud hosting service Amazon has recently signed a huge cloud computing contract with the US government-owned CIA drug-cartel.

The contract is, according to FCW, worth up to $600 million over 10 years.

How many Tor exit nodes are hosted by Amazon, and what does this mean for the security for Tor-users exiting from Amazon cloud computers?



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